Last edited by Faebei
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Indigenising social work in Africa found in the catalog.

Indigenising social work in Africa

Kwaku Osei-Hwedie

Indigenising social work in Africa

by Kwaku Osei-Hwedie

  • 191 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Ghana Universities Press in Accra .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social service,
  • Human services,
  • Public welfare,
  • Social work education

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementedited [by] Kwaku Osei-Hwedie and Gloria Jacques
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHV438 .I535 2007+
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 274 p. :
    Number of Pages274
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24810201M
    ISBN 109964303521
    LC Control Number2011342267

    "This comprehensive scholarly book on social work in East Africa is a most welcome addition to the global literature on professional social work. Insightful chapters on poverty reduction, development, gender perspectives and the state of social work will interest readers from around the world and serve as essential material for the region. Effective intervention roles of South African social workers in an appropriate, relevant and progressive social welfare model. Journal of Social Development in Africa, 9(1) NTUSI, T.

      Social Work in Africa is aimed at programs and practise in Ghana; at the same time, it is intended as a framework for the creation of culturally relevant social work curricula in other African countries and other contexts. The Amazon Book Review Book recommendations, author interviews, editors' picks, and more. Author: Linda Kreitzer. As the discussions and debates rage on about the content and direction of social work in Africa, the challenges associated with weaning the profession off its Western and North American roots become apparent. The desire to indigenise or make the profession culturally relevant is well articulated in the literature. Some efforts have been undertaken toward achieving this desire.

    social work – psychiatric social workers, hospital almoners, etc. – operated sep-arate systems of education and training, and in effect created parallel routes into 38 SOCIAL WORK WITH OLDER PEOPLE LymberyChqxd 7/29/ PM Page the occupation. The search for an alternative rationale for social work was a. Global knowledge is increasingly essential for all aspects of social work. Today's professionals respond to concerns including permeable borders, the upheavals of war, displaced workers, natural disasters, international adoption, and human trafficking. Everywhere, social workers work with service users and colleagues from diverse cultures and countries.


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Indigenising social work in Africa by Kwaku Osei-Hwedie Download PDF EPUB FB2

PDF | On Jan 1,Selelo F. Rapholo and others published Indigenising forensic social work in South Africa | Find, read and cite all the research you need on Indigenising social work in Africa book. As the discussions and debates rage on about the content and direction of social work in Africa, the challenges associated with weaning the profession off its Western and North American roots.

The Handbook of Social Work and Social Development in Africa book. Edited By Mel Gray. Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 26 October Pub. location London. Imprint Routledge. DOI Pages by: 1. The book of readings provides a review of social work issues especially within the Nigerian context.

It is a text with 18 chapters dealing with specific social work topics: social work in/with. The need to clarify the basis of social work practice in Africa is an urgent one. Bernstein () asks aquestion with respect to social work in South Africa which is pertinent for the rest of Africa. One may well ask whether the emphasis in training is a response to the needs of the field or whether the service offered in the field is the result of theAuthor: Kwaku Osei Hwedie.

The concept of indigenisation of social work knowledge has been widely used in relation to issues surrounding technology transfer and goodness-of-fit with the recipient of this knowledge.

In this research, the authors present an analysis of the process by which social work technology in alcoholism treatment is transferred from the United States.

Indigenising Social Work Education edge and practices, became a role model of social work indigenisation in Chi-na, and, at the same time, Hong Kong was allowed to see itself as a conduit for assisting China in making its own imprint on social work education.

The relevance of language in the process of indigenising life skills education in South Africa: A social work perspective J C Makhubele, L I Qalinge Requires Subscription PDF Trends and current status of indigenous knowledge among the inhabitants of the Turkwel riverine in Kenya T E Akuja, B M Mutua, A Y Guliye, C M Gichaba, M W Ngigi.

The book Professional Social Work in East Africa: Towards Social Development, Poverty Reduction and Gender Equality (), which he published together with Janestic M. Twikirize and Gidraph G. Wairire, has become a major reference on social work in the East African region.

challenged the social work profession in Africa to respond more effectively to the current realities facing the continent. Thus, while social workers in Africa may resemble social workers elsewhere, they will also differ in terms of the skills they possess to meet the needs ofthe societies in which they work.

Educational programs designed to   She edited the first book on Developmental Social Work in South Africa (David Philip ) and has long had an interest in the responsive of Western social work to non-Western contexts. She also published Social Work: A beginner’s text (), an introduction to the profession for social work students in South Africa.

Thus, social work practice within Chinese culture and communities seemed to be an unavoidable agenda in the future development of global social work practice.

This book is the first attempt in. The African Journal of Social Work is an international refereed journal that serves as a forum for exchanging ideas and knowledge and discussing issues relevant to social work practice, education and research in the African region. This chapter discusses the challenges, successes, and prospects of social work in Africa.

The prevailing socioeconomic situation in Africa presents a number of challenges for social work education and practice.

Social workers are faced with socioeconomic and cultural challenges that require a great deal of innovation. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Revision of the author's thesis (Ph.

D.)--University of Queensland, Australia. Description. However, on a more professional note, social work in Africa is a relatively young profession introduced in the s. Although the first school of social work—the Cairo School of Social Work in Egypt—was established way back in (Yiman, ), the profession did not take root until the s.

Most African countries were once colonized. IFSW Africa. Social Work has a long history in Africa stemming back to pre-colonial times. The region now comprises 25 IFSW members who are working toward the establishment of a recognised social work profession association in all the region’s countries, and the visibility of the profession’s contributions in addressing the complex factors of poverty, HIV eradication, gender equality and.

Following the independence of many African countries in the s, social work educators in Africa sought to depart from their ‘Western’ traditions and develop approaches to professional teaching and practice appropriate to the African postcolonial context.

The Association for Social Work Education in Africa (ASWEA) led these endeavours between and   The focus of this article is on challenges and developments of social work in countries of the East African Community (EAC). The EAC is located in the African Great Lakes region and has six partner states: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and South Sudan which became the latest member in 1 On the one hand, an analysis of social work in these contexts must take into.

the relevance of language in the process of indigenising life skills education in south africa: a so Makhubele, J. C., & Qalinge, L. (Decem ). The relevance of language in the process of indigenising life skills education in South Africa: a social work perspective: IKS community development and resilience.

This timely book provides a much needed analysis of the major issues and debates regarding the dynamics of social problems in the African context. Social Problems in Africa is broken into four parts.

The first introduces readers to the nature of social problems in general and provides a framework for analyzing and understanding social problems. Book Description. Riding on the success of Indigenous Social Work Around the World, this book provides case studies to further scholarship on decolonization, a major analytical and activist paradigm among many of the world’s Indigenous Peoples, including educators, tribal leaders, activists, scholars, politicians, and citizens at the grassroots level.

There are so many exciting social work approaches coming from Africa. This journal will capture the voice and experience of African practitioners – we will all benefit from this”.

AJSW’s editors have said they are happy to receive contributions from all over the world, if they are relevant to African social work.